Bmi Doctors

Weight Loss Medicine

Semaglutide Weekly Injections

Semaglutide is the FDA-Approved active ingredient used in Wegovy® and Ozempic® that has helped thousands of people lose and maintain weight loss in combination with diet and exercise.
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Semaglutide Dosing Plan

Semaglutide Dosing Plan
The Semaglutide you may be prescribed is a generic compounded medication and is not associated with the Novo Nordisk™ company or the brand-name medications Wegovy® or Ozempic®.

Semaglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, which is a type of medication used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It works by increasing insulin secretion and reducing glucose production in the liver, leading to improved glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Semaglutide is available as a once-weekly subcutaneous injection. Semaglutide has been shown to effectively cause weight loss.

Dosing:
The recommended starting dose of semaglutide as a subcutaneous injection is 0.25 mg once weekly, which can be increased to 0.5 mg, 1.0 mg, or 1.5 mg once weekly based on individual tolerance and glucose control.

Side Effects:

As with any medication, semaglutide can have side effects, and some of the most common ones include:

  1. Nausea: Semaglutide can cause nausea, which can lead to vomiting in some cases.
  2. Diarrhea: Semaglutide can cause diarrhea, which can be mild or severe.
  3. Constipation: Semaglutide can also cause constipation, which can lead to discomfort and abdominal pain.
  4. Headache: Semaglutide can cause headaches, which can range from mild to severe.
  5. Dizziness: Semaglutide can cause dizziness, which can make it difficult to perform daily activities.
  6. Fatigue: Semaglutide can cause fatigue, which can lead to a lack of energy and motivation.
  7. Hypoglycemia: Semaglutide can cause low blood sugar levels, which can lead to symptoms such as shakiness, confusion, and weakness.
  8. Injection site reactions: Semaglutide is injected under the skin, and it can cause redness, swelling, and pain at the injection site.

It is important to note that not everyone who takes semaglutide will experience these side effects, and some people may experience other side effects not listed here. If you are experiencing any side effects from semaglutide or have any concerns about the medication, it is important to talk to your healthcare provider.

Less common but serious side effects include pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), and thyroid cancer. However, these side effects are rare and have been observed in clinical trials with a low frequency.

Research Citations:
Marso SP, Daniels GH, Brown-Frandsen K, et al. Liraglutide and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes. N Engl J Med 2016;375:311–322.
Russell-Jones D, Vaag A, Schmitz O, et al. Liraglutide vs insulin glargine and placebo in combination with metformin and sulfonylurea therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus (LEAD-4 Met+SU): a randomised controlled trial. Diabetologia. 2009 Nov;52(11):2288-98.
Pratley RE, Nauck MA, Wilding JP, et al. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist liraglutide improves glycaemic control and reduces bodyweight: a 26-week double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study in inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes patients. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2010 Jan;12(1):45-53.

Nausea: In clinical trials, the most commonly reported adverse event with semaglutide was nausea. A study by Ahmann et al. (2018) found that 31.5% of patients experienced nausea with semaglutide treatment compared to 9.9% with placebo.

Reference: Ahmann, A. J., Capehorn, M., Charpentier, G., Dotta, F., Henkel, E., Lingvay, I., … & Tack, C. J. (2018). Efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide versus daily sitagliptin as an add-on to metformin, thiazolidinediones, or both, in patients with type 2 diabetes (SUSTAIN 2): a 56-week, double-blind, phase 3a, randomised trial. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, 6(4), 275-286.

Diarrhea: Semaglutide can also cause diarrhea, as reported in several clinical trials. A study by Aroda et al. (2017) found that 4.8% of patients experienced diarrhea with semaglutide treatment compared to 1.9% with placebo.

Reference: Aroda, V. R., Bain, S. C., Cariou, B., Piletič, M., Rose, L., Axelsen, M., … & Buse, J. B. (2017). Efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide versus once-daily insulin glargine as add-on to metformin (with or without sulfonylureas) in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes (SUSTAIN 4): a randomised, open-label, parallel-group, multicentre, multinational, phase 3a trial. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, 5(5), 355-366.

Hypoglycemia: Semaglutide can cause low blood sugar levels, particularly when used in combination with other diabetes medications. A study by Ahrén et al. (2018) found that 10.5% of patients experienced hypoglycemia with semaglutide treatment compared to 3.6% with placebo.

Reference: Ahrén, B., Masmiquel, L., Kumar, H., Sargin, M., Karsbøl, J. D., Jacobsen, S. H., … & Derving Karsbøl, J. (2018). Efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide versus once-daily insulin glargine as add-on to metformin (with or without sulfonylureas) in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes (SUSTAIN 4): a randomised, open-label, parallel-group, multicentre, multinational, phase 3a trial. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, 6(4), 275-286.

Injection site reactions: Semaglutide is administered via subcutaneous injection, and injection site reactions are a common side effect. A study by Rodbard et al. (2018) found that 7.4% of patients experienced injection site reactions with semaglutide treatment compared to 2.4% with placebo.

Reference: Rodbard, H. W., Lingvay, I., Reed, J., de la Rosa, R., Rose, L., Sugimoto, D., … & Buse, J. B. (2018). Sem

Weight loss medications are drugs that are used to help people lose weight by reducing their appetite or increasing the amount of calories they burn. There are several different types of weight loss medications that work through different mechanisms, including:

1. Appetite Suppressants: These medications work by reducing hunger and decreasing the amount of food consumed. Examples of appetite suppressants include phentermine and diethylpropion.

2. Lipase Inhibitors: These medications work by blocking the digestive enzyme lipase, which breaks down fats in the diet. As a result, some of the fat in food is not absorbed and is eliminated from the body. An example of a lipase inhibitor is Orlistat.

3. Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SRI): These medications work by increasing the level of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which can help reduce hunger and improve feelings of fullness. An example of an SRI used for weight loss is Fluoxetine.

4. GLP-1 Agonists: These medications mimic the hormone GLP-1, which helps regulate glucose and insulin levels, reduces appetite and slows gastric emptying. An example of a GLP-1 agonist is semaglutide.

5. Thermogenic Agents: These medications increase metabolic rate and promote fat burning by increasing the production of heat in the body. Examples of thermogenic agents include caffeine and synephrine.

Note that BMI Doctors only works with GLP-1 Agonists as we prescribe semaglutide.

It is important to note that weight loss medications are not a cure-all and should not be used as a substitute for lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise. They are typically used in combination with a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity to produce significant weight loss.

Additionally, weight loss medications can have side effects and may interact with other medications, so it is important to talk to a healthcare provider before starting any weight loss medication.

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